e-glass weekly - September 11, 2007 | Vol 2, Num 37
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GlassBuild America breaks records at opening

More show coverage at:
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The largest glass show in North America opened Monday with a record number of exhibitors at the second largest convention center in the United States ...

The largest glass show in North America opened Monday with a record number of exhibitors at the second largest convention center in the United States.

GlassBuild America: The Glass Window & Door Expo attracted 540 companies to the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta. The number included about 160 international companies, 130 new exhibitors and others that were returning to the show for the first time in years. Registration counts neared 9,000.

“We had a great opening day,” said Denise Sheehan, vice president of Industry Events at the National Glass Association, McLean, Va. “The exhibitors I have talked to have commented on the quantity and quality of the attendees. I think we exceeded everyone's expectations, and we are thrilled with the turn out."

The opening day of GlassBuild America included the Glazing Executives Forum, an all-day symposium focusing on commercial glass, and the first day of Preventing Insulating Glass Failures presented by the Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance, Ottawa, Ontario. Attendance at the Glazing Executives Forum reached 141—40 percent higher than last year.

"We had a stellar line up of speakers, and the NFRC [National Fenestration Rating Council] point/counterpoint segment really did live up to its contentious expectations," said David Walker, NGA vice president of Association Services.  "We got a lot of great feedback from attendees this year, and everyone walked away with more knowledge to make their business better."

For the first time, GlassBuild America included an Auto Glass Pavilion to meet the needs of retailers and distributors involved in auto glass repair and replacement. Suppliers and installation experts were on hand to answer questions from attendees. NGA officials unveiled an online auto glass technician certification program. As of January 2008, auto glass technicians will have the option to take certification tests online at their shop locations via a secure Web site.

Officials from the Hurricane Test Laboratory of Riviera Beach, Fla., put on a windborne debris impact resistance demonstration. An air cannon fired a 9-pound 2-by-4 at 34 miles per hour into ¼-inch non-impact monolithic glass and 9/16-inch impact-resistant laminated glass with polyvinyl butyral interlayer. The 2-by-4 shattered the non-impact glass. The impact-resistant glass cracked but did not shatter.

GlassBuild America is organized by the NGA, in partnership with IGMA, the Glass Association of North America, Topeka, Kan., the American Architectural Manufacturers Association, Schaumburg, Ill., and the Bath Enclosure Manufacturers Association, Topeka. It has been listed as one of the Top 200 largest U.S. tradeshows for four years in a row in the annual listing compiled by Tradeshow Week magazine.

CMA debate highlights Glazing Executives Forum

Margaret Webb, executive director, Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance, Ottawa, Ontario, and Jim Benney, director, National Fenestration Rating Council, Greenbelt, Md., engaged in “Point-Counter Point” as part of the second annual Glazing Executives Forum ...

Margaret Webb, executive director, Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance, Ottawa, Ontario, and Jim Benney, director, National Fenestration Rating Council, Greenbelt, Md., engaged in “Point-Counter Point” as part of the second annual Glazing Executives Forum, Sept. 10, at the Georgia World Congress Center. One hundred and forty-one attendees crowded the room to hear Webb and Benney. The forum took place on the opening day of GlassBuid America.

When Webb and Benney got into the technical nitty-gritty of the Component Modeling Approach, Rodney Van Buskirk, chairman for the National Glass Association and president of Bacon & Van Buskirk Glass Co. in Champaign, Ill., interrupted, and asked them to explain why the glaziers need NFRC when the AAMA standards were already in place. Members of the audience also asked why they need CMA and what the specific numbers meant in dollars.

“You are over-analyzing the whole thing,” one of the audience members said, “we need a simpler system.”

Another member asked who was profiting from the NFRC system; Benney responded “Theoretically, the public.”

The general consensus was that the CMA was not required. Webb urged the members to attend the NFRC meetings. “I’d like each one of you to go to the NFRC Web site, download the documents and read,” she said. “And then I’d like you to contact Jim. And if you want to make sure your voice is heard, you have to come to the meetings.”

Other than the “Point-Counter Point,” the forum also included a talk about the Second Annual Benchmark Study Results by John Brandt, CEO, MPI Group in Shaker Heights, Ohio; an economic forecast by Jeff Dietrich, senior analyst, Institute for Trend Research in Concord, N.H.; and breakout sessions on glazing products facilitated by John Heinaman, president, Heinaman Contract Glazing in Lake Forest, Calif., and metal products facilitated by Kevin McMahon, president, K-Man Glass Corp. in Bethel, Conn. 

Business breakout sessions included “Recruiting, Training, Retaining in the Contract Glazing Industry” facilitated by Ron Clawson, principal, Quattrolifts USA Ltd. in Henderson, Nev., and “Peak Performance and Performance Management” facilitated by Richard Voreis, CEO of Consulting Collaborative in Dallas.

--By Sahely Mukerji, managing editor, Glass Magazine

IGMA grows in the international market

Organization hosts educational seminar in Atlanta
One of the largest areas of growth for the Ottawa, Ontario-based Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance is taking place outside of North America ...

One of the largest areas of growth for the Ottawa, Ontario-based Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance is taking place outside of North America, Executive Director Margaret Webb said Sept. 10 during the group’s education seminar.

IGMA’s certification and standards programs extend internationally, she said. “We have international reach at this point with two product certification programs. They’re all over the globe,” Webb said. “It’s one of the areas where we are seeing the most growth.”

IGMA is certified by the International Organization for Standardization, giving it an worldwide playing field for standards, said Bill Lingnell, president of Lingnell Consulting Services and technical consultant to IGMA.

Membership is also moving to a more international level, Lingnell said. Members come from countries across the globe, such as Australia and Japan, he said, and one of the association’s newest members is a testing laboratory in China.

“This is an area of potential growth for IGMA,” he said.

Webb and Lingnell spoke during IGMA’s two-day Preventing Insulating Glass Failures Educational Seminar that runs through today. The event is held in conjunction with GlassBuild America: The Glass, Window and Door  Expo at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta.

About 30 industry representatives attended the seminar on day one. The majority of attendees came from residential and commercial IG companies. However, two new segments were represented—architects and outside consultants, Lingnell said.

An architect at the meeting, Dirk Meyer, enclosure consultant for the office of the chief architect at the U.S. General Services Administration, says understanding glass systems is becoming more important for designers as stronger and more efficient building envelops become the norm.

Presentations at the meeting covered glass receiving, cutting and washing; dessicants; do’s and don’ts of using rigid and flexible spacer systems, and muntin bars; handling coated glass; sealants; thermal performance; and glass and glass breakage.

Read more coverage of the educational tomorrow on www.glassmagazine.net.

'Business as Usual' byword at Efco Corp.

“Seamless transition” is a term Kathy Harkema, corporate spokesperson for the Pella Corp., uses frequently in talking about Pella’s acquisition of Efco Corp. in Monett ...

Story reprinted with permission from The Monett-Times in Monett, Mo.
--
By Murray Bishoff, managing editor

“Seamless transition” is a term Kathy Harkema, corporate spokesperson for the Pella Corporation, uses frequently in talking about Pella’s acquisition of Efco Corporation in Monett.

Harkema has spent much of the past week in Monett. As she observed, it’s “business as usual” in Monett’s factories. The “marriage” between Pella and Efco, now known as “Efco, a Pella company”, is being viewed as a natural and comfortable process.

It’s still early in the relationship, but what seems evident is Pella does not appear to be out to shake things up in Monett. In fact, Harkema talks about Efco in terms similar to a suitor at a dance. Efco had long been respected for its “tradition of innovation” and quality products. Now, when the two have come together, she viewed as “as historic time for Efco and Pella.”

What is apparent from Harkema’s observations is the value Pella places on Efco in bringing aluminum products of a high range and quality to the Pella family. She listened with interest on the factory floor as Jerry Burks, department manager in the double hung assembly division, showed her a line of products being made for the Pentagon, the first time Efco has filled an order for that national landmark.

Burks pointed out a special feature in the large multi-pane panels for the Pentagon. On the bottom of several sections of glass, the image of a fireman’s helmet had been added to the glass. These were the panels, Burks noted, that could be broken out to provide access. Thus a specified strategy was being built into the product, while the remaining glass could prove much harder to enter. Custom work is standard fare in Efco products.

Nor was this the first high profile order for Efco. Burks observed the company has made windows for the Empire State Building, the World Trade Center in New York, and for years has filled orders for Trump Properties. It’s no longer unusual seeing an order to go in one of Donald Trump’s buildings in the factory, so much so that Burks doesn’t track back to see where that set of windows will end up. “They could go anywhere,” he added.

Efco’s main plant is a big deal in Pella’s family. Harkema observed Pella’s main facility in Pella, Iowa, employs 4,000 people. Beyond that, however, the many production facilities in the Pella family generally employ between 250 and 500. That makes the Monett operation the second largest in the Pella family.

Questions about management changes still loom in the emerging relationship. Harkema stressed Pella wants Efco to remain strong, and to continue offering its customers what they are used to seeing. For example, Rob Jones will continue as operations manager. Mark Kaiser will still be vice president in charge of sales, marketing, and customer service. Larry Eden will remain the chief information officer. The field representatives will stay in place.

It was still early for answering other questions. Harkema indicated who will step in as chief executive officer had not yet been determined. That fit with earlier indications that there was no fixed time set for retiring CEO Chris Fuldner’s departure.

Efforts to develop synergy between the Efco part of the family and Pella were developing. There were plans for Efco people to tour different Pella operations “to get to know different family members.” Harkema suggested there was a desire to learn from each other that would help enhance the relationship between the companies as it progressed.

“There’s a tremendous pride here [in Monett],” Harkema observed, “a tradition of building quality products we hope can continue for generations to come.”

Part of that can be seen in Efco’s work force. Burks observed that of the 102 people working under him, 15 to 20 will have been there over 15 years. Over half will have been in their jobs for at least five years. Harkema noted that includes both men and women, working shoulder to shoulder on the line.

Longevity like that, she commented, “speaks well of any employer. The community is proud of its manufacturing base. Pella is proud to carry on that tradition.”

Harkema especially stressed that the 1,600 jobs in Monett were going to continue, including all three shifts. Pella had every interest in seeing Efco, its brand name and product line, grow with time, as it would have done on its own.

The “marriage” offers even more opportunities, for the company, and careers within the company, she added.
Pella has for many years maintained a commitment to community outreach and charitable work, linking to its communities. Supporting diabetes research has been a big priority, and the company has participated in 17 projects with ABC’s Extreme Makeover: Home Edition show. In fact, Harkema personally participated on Pella’s team that added to Camp Barnabas two years ago. She implied Pella will not be pulling Efco back from being an active part of the Monett community.

So far, the reception to the new owners appears to be going well. Pella officials went through the Efco offices while they were in town last week, greeting staff and introducing themselves. “They were very nice,” a staff member told The Times.

“You can see the smiles on people’s faces, going through the plant,” Harkema said. Moreover, she recalled walking around town, wearing her Pella shirt, and being stopped by people who have simply said, “Thank you for coming.”

Harkema stressed the similarity between Pella and Efco as family owned, small-town-based, Midwestern companies would be¬come progressively more evident, making the marriage work. “It’s an exciting time to be here,” she added.

More top stories

...

OSHA cites Glasswall with 26 safety violations
Officials from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, part of the U.S. Department of Labor, proposed fines of $67,650 against window manufacturer Glasswall LLC of Miami, according to a Sept. 4 OSHA release … read more

Glass roof panels shatter over indoor pool
Three glass skylight panels fell from the roof 10 meters into a pool below in Geelong, Australia, according to an Aug. 31 article from the Geelong Advertiser. About 30 people were in the pool during the accident; no one was injured … read more

AGC Flat Glass Europe develops antibacterial glass
Brussels-based AGC Flat Glass Europe, formerly Glaverbel, introduced a flat glass product that kills 99.9 percent of bacteria and stops spread of fungi, according to a Sept. 6 company release. The product is designed for hospital applications … read more

Architectural Testing launches blast and security certification program
Architectural Testing Inc. of York, Pa., started a certification program for fenestration products involving blast hazard mitigation, forced entry and ballistics, according to a Sept. 6 release … read more

Canada increases required number of apprentices for glazing trade
Canadian lawmakers changed the Trades Qualification and Apprenticeship Act to require more apprentices per journeyman in several trades, including architectural glass and metal, according to a Sept. 4 article from the Daily Commercial News and Construction Record in Markham, Ontario.

The old ratio required one apprentice for every four journeymen in the architectural glass and metal trade, while the new ratio is one-to-one, according to the article … read more

Glazing tape

Frank Lowe Rubber and Gasket Co. of Farmingdale, N.Y., introduced cross-linked polyethylene glazing tapes with a double coated acrylic adhesive. Series GLZ 3500 is available in 1/16-inch and 1/8-inch thicknesses and Series GLZ 5500 is 1/32-inch thick ...

Frank Lowe Rubber and Gasket Co. of Farmingdale, N.Y., introduced cross-linked polyethylene glazing tapes with a double coated acrylic adhesive. Series GLZ 3500 is available in 1/16-inch and 1/8-inch thicknesses and Series GLZ 5500 is 1/32-inch thick. Both series provide fast initial tack along with an easy-release film liner, according to a company release. Certified by the American Architectural Manufacturers Association, Schaumburg, Ill., they bond with wood, aluminum, stainless steel and polyvinyl chloride window frames. They block water, moisture, light and dust, and resist ultraviolet, weathering, oxidation, and temperature variation. The tapes are supplied with a non-tear blue film liner.

800/777-0202 | www.franklowe.com

Nonresidential construction stays strong in July

Nonresidential construction posted more gains in July, despite the fall of the subprime mortgage market that many economists expected would hurt all segments of the building industry ...

Nonresidential construction posted more gains in July, despite the fall of the subprime mortgage market that many economists expected would hurt all segments of the building industry, according to a Sept. 4 release from the Associated General Contractors of America, in Arlington, Va.

“Nonresidential construction shrugged off the turmoil in homebuilding and credit markets in July to post another solid gain,” said Ken Simonson, AGC chief economist, in the release. “Although total construction spending slipped 0.4 percent in July, seasonally adjusted … nonresidential spending climbed 0.6 percent, the 10th consecutive monthly gain.”

According to the July Census Bureau construction report, also released Sept. 4, the segments of the commercial market that saw the most growth in the month include multiretail, up 4 percent in July, 28 percent year-to-date, and private office, up 0.6 percent for the month, 22 percent year-to-date, Simonson noted. Private health care also increased 1.3 percent for the month, 13 percent year-to date, according to the AGC release.

“I anticipate [health building] will remain vigorous, but I expect credit-sensitive types such as office, warehouse, retail and lodging to slow soon,” Simonson said in the release.

Public construction was up 0.7 percent for July, 11 percent year-to-date, led by education construction that rose 1.9 percent for the month, 12 percent year-to-date, according to the release.

Business headlines

...

Asahi India Glass reports huge growth in architectural segment
Officials from Asahi India Glass say the company’s architectural segment grew by 50 percent in the 2008 fiscal year, according to a Sept. 6 Reuters report. The automotive segment that represents about 40 percent of Asahi India Glass’ revenue grew 13 percent to 14 percent during the year, according to the article … read more

Bystronic Glass to move headquarters from New York to Colorado
Bystronic Glass Inc. of Hauppauge, N.Y., will move its headquarters to its Aurora, Colo., location that opened in June, according to a Sept. 6 company release … read more

DFI plans U.S. and Puerto Rico expansion
Officials from Diamon-Fusion International Inc. of San Clemente, Calif., announced the company increased its sales representation with Aronoff and Associates of Potomac, Md., and DeGorter Inc. of Monroe, N.C., according to a Sept. 5 DFI release. The additions will help the company expand into the Mid-Atlantic, South and Puerto Rico, according to the release … read more