December 4, 2007 | Vol 2, Num 49
e-glass weekly, your weekly source for industry news and financial data

Read the December issue of Glass Magazine

e-Poll
High winds have hit the Midwest to the East Coast in the last two days. Have high winds ever forced you to stop glass installations on a job?
Yes.
No.
No, but we've been very close.


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Last week's poll results: 
When will a nonresidential slowdown occur, if at all?

36.62%: First half of 2008

33.8%: Nonresidential will remain strong for the next two years

29.58%: Second half of 2008


 

 

 


News to know

PGC symposium offers valuable facts, data
About 100 people attended the Annual Symposium by the Protective Glazing Council of Topeka, Kan., at the Crystal City Marriott, Arlington, Va., Nov. 28-29. Sessions were chock-full of information on the history as well as updates on codes and standards, insurance practices, and new products and trends in the market... read more

New York keeps the Northeast market hot


Part three of four

The Northeast has one major asset in the face of the nationwide residential construction slump: New York. The 23-square-mile city that never sleeps has been resilient to the housing decline affecting the rest of the country and has even experienced a luxury residential building boom ... read more

Scammers strike glass companies in fraud spree
During the last week, a number of glass company managers contacted e-glass weekly about an apparent spree of ordering scams that could cost companies thousands of dollars if not detected ... read more

More top stories

... read more


Product spotlight

Window grill program
Kingston, Ontario-based Opticut Technologies Inc. developed the DaVinci Works GridLock Program for designing and making windows with complex grill configurations. The program captures measurements required to construct grills ... read more

Financials

Guardian, Pilkington, Asahi and Saint-Gobain fined for price-fixing
The European Union fined four glass companies a total of about $724 million on Nov. 28 for conspiring to raise European market prices for flat glass. EU officials state that the four companies coordinated several simultaneous price increases between 2004 and 2005 ... read more

Business headlines

... read more


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Project news:

Cast glass wall highlights One South Dearborn lobby
“The way the glass is fixed is very unique. … The 48 panels that are 3 feet by 10 feet are only supported at 6 inches from both ends. We carved a half round notch about 4-inches long and ½-inch wide in the center of the 1.5-inch thick glass." —Bertrand Charest, president, Think Glass 

The basics: The lobby of One South Dearborn in Chicago features a stunning array of decorative glass elements, including two 18-foot by 40-foot wall of cast-glass panels, one of the largest displays in the world, and a 13-foot decorative glass pylon.
The players:
Architect, DeStefano & Keating, Los Angeles; developer, Hines Development, Los Angeles; glass supplier, Think Glass, Montreal; installation, Harmon Inc., Eden Prairie, Minn

The glass and systems:
13-foot glass pylon 30 blocks of 5-inch thick glass with uneven, chiseled edges, all mounted with silicone. The walls feature 48 cast glass panels extending 2 inches to 3 inches in thickness. The 600-pound panels held in place with braces that attach to a thin and discreet stainless steel structure behind the wall.

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Photo by Think Glass, Montreal

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